5 Web Design Elements that Make Your Site Look Old School

In this Two Minute Tuesday, Matt will tell you how to keep your site looking so fresh and so clean in order to draw customers and increase conversions.



When selling online, your site design is just as important as the items you stock. Most people have the attention span of a goldfish, so it’s crucial to catch their eyeballs with a compelling and unique layout. Enjoy the return of Two Minute Tuesdays with this handy video about how to keep your site ahead of the rest!

About 

Matt Winn is Volusion’s Senior Brand Manager, where he helps oversee the organization’s branding and communications efforts. Matt has created hundreds of articles, videos and seminars on all things ecommerce, ranging from online marketing to web design and customer experience. Beyond being a certified nerd, Matt is an avid college football fan, enthusiastic home cook and a self-admitted reality TV junkie.

17 Responses to “5 Web Design Elements that Make Your Site Look Old School”

  1. Rich

    Hello Matt,
    I do have a responsive home template. However, when I view it on my iphone 6 it looks way too big. Any suggestions? Here’s my URL http://www.detroitdiecast.com
    Thank you,

    Reply
    • Andrea Kinnison

      Hi Rich, thanks for watching and for your question! We took a look on an iPhone6 Plus and the overall layout seems accurate to us. You do want to have text bigger for phones and tablets because bigger text is definitely easier to read on the go. As for the photos, one option might be for you to shoot the photos a bit farther away from the products as the close up shots can indeed appear as large. That being said, you’ve got some very interesting products for sale and having the ability to see that much detail is a plus. If there’s anything that we can do to help, please let us know and we can get you in touch with a member of our Design Services team. Hope this helps! Thanks, Rich!

      Reply
  2. Robert

    While the new, more modern looking sites are great for fashion or “hipster” sites. Many sites like mine ( http://www.caregivergear.com), however, sell more mundane products with many variables. My shoppers are looking for “nuts and bots” solutions to their problems. The “adaptive” templates on Volusion are not really suitable for products that “one would rather not be visual,” like adult diapers. I need big menus and less digging to find what my customers are looking for in put products. Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Andrea Kinnison

      Hi Robert, good question here. Totally understand what you’re saying about not needing all of the homepage promos for your site, so in that case, no need for you to use them if you don’t want to. If you’re looking to use one of our responsive template, simply tell your Implementation Specialist from Volusion to ditch the homepage content and just go straight into Featured Products from your admin slideshow. If you’re looking for a responsive template with a left navigation, try out Royal or Material; or, if you’d like to take a look at one of our free templates, you could look into some custom hourly work to have your needs better incorporated into your template. Hope this helps – thanks!

      Reply
      • Quincy

        It might also be worth checking out some emulators where you can quickly test your site across different devices and screen size. A quick google search will bring up a few options.

        Reply
  3. John Milburn

    Nice to see the return of two minute Tuesday. Perhaps you can do a two minute Tuesday of how to get out of a loop. No sales = no reviews. No reviews = no sales. No sales = no re-investment into site. No re-investment = more no sales.
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Andrea Kinnison

      Hey John, glad to have Two Minute Tuesday back as well! That’s a great suggestion for a topic, we’ll be sure to add it to the list. Stay tuned!

      Reply
  4. Rick

    1999 MySpace page? Uh, MySpace did not exist until 2003.

    Reply
  5. Will Brown

    I find the article humorous as the Volusion templates themselves are locked in a time capsule. Milonic DHTML menu from 2008. anyone? And in fairness in 2008 Milonic itself was a good 10 years behind.

    Reply
  6. fran Liscio

    Hi Gracelyn! It would be really funny to put together a website for a fake product that incorporates every single bad element you described, starting with the bad stock photography.

    Reply
    • Gracelyn Tan

      Oh, I can’t take the credit for this video, Fran. It was all Matt. :) But yes, I do think that could be funny, while also being (somewhat) educational!

      Reply
  7. fran Liscio

    I love this post and your suggestions are great. I’d love to see another one of these that continues the theme, it’s a great untapped region.
    also, and feel free to delete this, but one small typo: credibility, not credability.
    Just cause I’m a spelling nerd. :-)

    Reply
    • Gracelyn Tan

      Whoops! Thanks for the catch, Fran! And thanks for watching!

      Reply
  8. Michael McWilliams

    We love Matt! #maderahome

    Reply
  9. Karen

    Hi Matt:
    Since simplicity is in, what do you think about slide shows as a design element? Do they unnecessarily complicate things? Are they quickly becoming “old school”?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Matt Winn

      Hi Karen, great question. I’m all about slideshows for ecommerce sites – it’s a great way to speak to multiple audiences that come to your site. For example, you can highlight some of your best products, a compelling offer and anything inbetween. The great thing about slideshows is that you can say quite a bit without using a lot of space, which I think is highly useful. You can also incorporate calls to action in each of your slides, which is extremely helpful in getting customers to click deeper into your site. Thanks! -Matt

      Reply
  10. Laura Mcfarlin

    Thanks Matt, great Two Minute Tuesday.

    Reply

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